Posts Tagged with “Jon Stewart”

Amber Day discusses what journalists can learn from ‘Daily Show’

May 4th, 2011

In his blog, "Confessions of an Aca/Fan," Henry Jenkins, the Provost's Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, interviews Amber Day,  author of Satire and Dissent: Interventions in Contemporary Political Debate. Part one of the interview is here; part two is here.

Day is assistant professor of performance studies in the English and Cultural Studies Department of the College of Arts an Sciences.

The rise of political satire

March 4th, 2011

In this commentary for Northeast Public Radio's "Academic Minute," Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, explains the rise of political satire and why it is becoming a normal feature of political discourse.

Why more Americans are being informed and entertained by satire than ever before

February 16th, 2011

There is no need to fear "the increasing centrality of satire and irony, whether in the mushrooming world of parodic news or in the specter of pranksters offering fake press releases on behalf of the Chamber of Commerce," Assistant Professor Amber Day writes in her commentary for the Huffington Post.

Rather than signaling a cynical distrust of politics and a lack of real engagement, Day says, the rise of this earnest form of irony and satire signals that "professional entertainers, political activists, and average citizens are responding to the political discourse around them" in order to "make forceful political claims and to advocate action in the search for solutions to real problems."

Day is the author of the new book  Satire and Dissent: Interventions in Contemporary Political Debate.

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Professor’s new book explores growing impact of political satire in America

February 14th, 2011

Satire

SMITHFIELD, R.I. — There is currently a renaissance taking place in the realm of satire, with satirists elevated to the level of legitimate pundits, and political activists behaving as comedians.   But why has the power of satire entered the mainstream as a dominant means of political critique and engagement?

Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, has studied how political satire has come to launch the nightly news analysis of Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert and their contemporaries into the mainstream. Her spirited analysis is the basis of her new book, Satire and Dissent: Interventions in Contemporary Political Debate, released Feb. 15 by Indiana University Press. In it, Day explores how and why satire in today's political theater has gained such prominence with Stewart ranking as one of the most trusted newscasters in the United States and where the films of Michael Moore are a dominant topic of political campaign discourse.

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Amber Day part of New York Times online debate: When does a fake political rally turn real?

October 29th, 2010

Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, was invited by the New York Times to be a part of its online debate exploring the topic "When Does a Fake Political Rally Turn Real?" Her contribution to the seven-person debate is headlined "Satirists Telling the Truth."

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Jon Stewart and rally may shun politics, but attendees are embracing it

October 29th, 2010

Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, tells the New York Times that the political basis for satirist Jon Stewart's "Rally to Restore Sanity" Oct. 30 in Washington, D.C., is inescapable. "I think Jon is being cagey," said Day whose book, "Satire and Dissent," will be published in February. "What he wants to say is, it's not partisan. He wants to preserve his persona of just being the guy at the back of the class throwing spitballs."

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Op-Ed: Satire as antidote to a poisoned political debate, or ‘How I learned to stop worrying and love cable news’

October 28th, 2010

A slightly shorter version of the following op-ed by Amber Day was published by Newsday on Oct. 28.  Day is an assistant professor of English and cultural studies and author of the forthcoming book Satire and Dissent.

SMITHFIELD, R.I. — The  much-publicized "Rally to Restore Sanity" will draw thousands of Americans to Washington, D.C., on October 30th to take part in an event that is billed as "a rally for the people who've been too busy to go to rallies." The event is a spectacular example of the renaissance in political satire that is developing in the face of the stunning failings of public political discussion today.

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In call for a rally, comedians stir liberal expectations

October 28th, 2010

Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, tells the Los Angeles Times that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert are taking a risk in taking the outsider image they have cultivated on their Comedy Central shows to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Oct. 30. "They're definitely walking a tightrope. The danger absolutely is seeming to come too close to the things they critique," said Day, who teaches a course on political satire.

This article also appeared in newspapers and online news sites around the country.

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Serious comedy fills the discourse void

October 28th, 2010

This Newsday op-ed (available to paid subscribers only) by Amber Day, assistant professor of English and cultural studies, is a shorter version of this commentary.

Stewart-Colbert rally aims: 1. Change politics 2. Sell knickknacks

October 25th, 2010

Merchandising has become a part of the "Rally to Restore Sanity" to be held in Washington, D.C., and featuring satirists Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert.  The memorabilia and tie-ins are "a form of political engagement," Bryant professor Amber Day, author of "Satire and Dissent: Interventions in Contemporary Political Debate," tells the Christian Science Monitor. "The entertainment factor in the Stewart-Colbert rally is helping to drive a deeper political activism, because the rally is not simply a comedian's prank," she said.

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